Drills are used to improve specific areas of your technique; they can be used for full swing technique, pitching, chipping, bunker play and putting. There are hundreds of drills you can use; you just have to use the drills that you can relate to, to give you the correct feeling and correct positions.

Over the next few months, we will demonstrate some of the drills that we use at Sapphire Coast Golf School to help our students improve their technique.

Problem: Poor Posture & Set Up

If you have poor posture, it is hard to maintain a repetitive swing and good balance. You need a consistent routine to help you set up correctly. Watch your favorite players on TV; their swings might vary but they will all have a consistent setup routine.

Many players have had tips from friends about setting up, like “sit on the bar stool” or “stick your backside out”. We find that people who “sit on the bar stool” are more likely to become too vertical with too much knee bend. As for the “stick your backside out”; this can cause a tilt in your pelvis and a bad arch in your spine, locking your vertebrae together. These ‘tips’ have been around for years and can be dangerous as they can cause injuries to your body.

Fix: Posture Drill

Here is a routine to help you achieve the correct posture:

  • Stand up tall with your feet together, holding the club in front of you.
  • Bend forward from your hips about 30 degrees; allow your arms to hang down in front of you, your hands should be hanging underneath your mouth.
  • Allow your head to sit in its natural position.
  • Take a sideways step with each foot so that your feet are shoulder-width apart. If you are female, quite often your hips are wider than your shoulders; if so have your feet hip-width apart. This will help with your balance, giving you a stable base for your swing.
  • When you move your feet apart, this is where you need to have a slight knee bend and feel the weight distributed towards the balls of your feet. This helps with balance and the transfer of your weight during your swing.
  • Once you are in position, tilt your spine slightly away from your target. Be very careful you don’t move your weight onto your back foot. You should start your swing with slightly more weight on your front foot.
  • Keep moving either with a waggle of the club or moving your feet in your shoes, or very slightly moving on the spot. Be careful not to change your aim whilst doing this. This movement or waggle is important as it releases tension in your hands and body.

Problem: Poor shoulder turn

Many players make the mistake of turning down towards the ball instead of across. An incorrect shoulder turn makes it impossible to make consistent contact with the ball.

Problem: Inconsistent swing plane

As you start your backswing and your upper body starts to rotate back, your wrists need to hinge, (cock or bend — whichever term you have been taught it just means adding movement to the wrists to allows you to lever the club and keep the club on the correct swing plane). If you have an incorrect start to your back swing, you will be making compensations throughout your swing– making it difficult to consistently square up the clubface at impact.

Fix: Square Club Face Drill

This is our favorite drill; it has helped so many of our students when they leave us to go and practise by themselves. It gives you a visual guide to where the club should be positioned early in the backswing.

Problem: Strangulation of the Club

We all know what it feels like to strangle the golf club with your arms and shoulders so tensely that you can hardly take the club away. As stated earlier, this can cause tension and thus hinder the effectiveness of your swing.